inothernews

inothernews:

ICE, ICE, BABY  For years, Death Valley presented visitors with a mystery: those of the famed “sliding rocks.”  What made these small boulders seemingly glide across the playa, leaving tilled soil tracks in their wake?  The answer appears in the scientific journal PLOS One: a layer of ice, and a push from the wind.  Nature’s game of curling, we’d guess.  (Photos [from top]: Richard Norris / Jim Norris / Michael Hartman via The New York Times)

meowgon

meowgon:

you know when you google something and you find yourself in a whole other world where people care about things in a very similar way to fandom but about a totally different topic? it’s cute. cute. warning for massive photos of spiders on that page. the comments are gold

asylum-art

asylum-art:

Street Artists Cover Mexican Island In Murals To Help Save Sharks And Manta Rays - PangeaSeed

In collaboration with 1xRUN, Residencia Gorila, World Art Destinations and Juxtapoz Latin America, PangeaSeed are pleased to share with you the results of “Sea Walls: Murals for Oceans – Mexico Expedition”. The week-long mural festival resulted in 14 amazing large scale ocean-themed murals on the island of Isla Mujeres, Mexico.

Our goal was to raise awareness for the conservation of the ocean and greatly needed protection for the whale sharks and manta rays off the Yucatan peninsula, by means of art and creativity.

For this pioneering project, we collaborated with a select group of internationally acclaimed contemporary artists who were given the opportunity to swim with and study whale sharks and oceanic manta rays and experience these majestic giants in their natural environment. Both of these iconic ocean animals are listed as species threatened with extinction on the IUCN Red List of Endangered Species.

Inspired by their personal animal encounters, the artists created the murals to help educate and raise greatly needed awareness within the local and tourist communities as well as to highlight the benefits of ecotourism and the long-term sustainability of natural resources.

Photo courtesy of Tre’ Packard | PangeaSeed.org 2014

1..2.Tatiana Suarez (USA)

3. 4.Smithe (Mexico)

5.6..Nosego (USA)

7.8..Saner (Mexico)

9.Pelucas (Spain)

Via  boredpanda

cephalopodqueen
libutron:

Blue-cheeked Jacamar - Galbula cyanicollis 
Also referred to as Blue-necked Jacamar, Galbula cyanicollis (Piciformes - Galbulidae) is considered a species complex found across southern Amazonia, from eastern Peru and parts of Bolivia to east Amazonian Brazil.
This species can be easily distinguished by the yellow lower mandible and the bluish head and neck sides.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Ciro Albano | Locality: Brazil (2013)

libutron:

Blue-cheeked Jacamar - Galbula cyanicollis 

Also referred to as Blue-necked Jacamar, Galbula cyanicollis (Piciformes - Galbulidae) is considered a species complex found across southern Amazonia, from eastern Peru and parts of Bolivia to east Amazonian Brazil.

This species can be easily distinguished by the yellow lower mandible and the bluish head and neck sides.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Ciro Albano | Locality: Brazil (2013)

cephalopodqueen

cool-critters:

Candy crab (Hoplophrys oatesi)

The candy crab is a very colourful crab that grows from 1.5 to 2 cm. It lives on various species of soft coral in the Dendronephthya genus.

It camouflages itself by mimicing the colours of the polyps among which it hides. It adds further camouflage by attaching polyps to its carapace. Colours vary depending on the colour of the coral, and may be white, pink, yellow or red. This crab is widespread in the Indo-Pacific and it feeds on plankton.

photo credits: digimuse, Brian Maye, divemecressi

asylum-art

asylum-art:

The Ancient Art of Stone:Couple Creates Beautiful Rock Wall Art Installations

 Ancient Art of Stone | Facebook

Andreas Kunert and Naomi Zettl, a married artist duo based in Vancouver, create beautiful flowing wall installations out of rocks, pebbles, and other decorative elements.

I am passionate to give stone an articulated form. This involves finding the right stones – listening,” explains Kunert, who takes commissions through a website called Ancient Art Of Stone that he runs together with Zettl.

For those not planning major interior remodeling work any time soon, the couple also sells prints of smaller detailed and colorful work that they create specifically for this purpose. Due to their smaller size, these pieces can incorporate colorful stones and elements that just wouldn’t work in their larger installations. Take a look!

Via boredpanda

tyrannosaurslair
libutron:

Crimson Topaz 
 Topaza pella (Apodiformes - Trochilidae) is a South American species of hummingbird found in Brazil, French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname and Venezuela.
The Topaza hummingbirds are amongst the largest members of the family,  occupying lowland forests of northern Amazonia and the Guianan Shield where they apparently prefer the canopy and edge of forests on sandy soils, particularly along narrow blackwater streams and elsewhere near water.
The Crimson topaz shows sexual dimorphism of foot color and notable age-related variation in plumage. 
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Jerry Oldenettel
Locality: Barquilla de Fresa Lodge, Las Claritas, Venezuela

libutron:

Crimson Topaz 

Topaza pella (Apodiformes - Trochilidae) is a South American species of hummingbird found in Brazil, French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname and Venezuela.

The Topaza hummingbirds are amongst the largest members of the family,  occupying lowland forests of northern Amazonia and the Guianan Shield where they apparently prefer the canopy and edge of forests on sandy soils, particularly along narrow blackwater streams and elsewhere near water.

The Crimson topaz shows sexual dimorphism of foot color and notable age-related variation in plumage

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Jerry Oldenettel

Locality: Barquilla de Fresa Lodge, Las Claritas, Venezuela

koryos

realmonstrosities:

Moon Crabs have great, big paddles on the end of each of their thick, rather flattened legs.

They can use them to swim if they want, but what they really like to do is use their feet like shovels to bury themselves in sand at the drop of a hat.

Also they use their legs to add a bit of colour to their otherwise drab, sandy appearance. If you got shovels for feet, flaunt it. I guess.

…Images: budak/Andrey Papko/Bill & Mark Bell/Ria Tan