mucholderthen

mucholderthen:

A SPIDER THAT LOOKS LIKE A  PLANT
Cyphalonotus sp. [spider]
Selangor, Malaysia. 

Original post by Matthew Cobb at Why Evolution Is True

This fantastic picture was taken by Kurt, a nature/macro photographer based in Kuala Lumpur. What exactly it’s mimicking isn’t clear —it looks like a bit of honeysuckle flower to me. I initially assumed this was an ambush predator, but other photos by Kurt show that it spins a web (you can see the web underneath it), although it’s not clear whether that’s part of the deception or is used directly to trap prey.

To which Jerry Coyne, [Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago], adds:

[JAC: I suspect that its mimicry is that it looks like a bit of flower or vegetation caught in a web, and the mimicry could also act when it was “between webs.”] 

Pictures via Flickr / sharing enabled.
All rights reserved by Kurt (Hock Ping GUEK)
Species ID credit: Nicky Bay. 

rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

libutron:

Regal Horned Lizard - Phrynosoma solare | ©Jason Penney   (Tohono O’odham Indian Reservation, southwest Arizona, US)
Phyrnosoma solare (Phrynosomatidae) are among the larger species of Horned Lizard. Their Latin name is derived from the meaning “rays of the sun” by referring to four large occipital horns at the base of the head continuous with six temporal horns, form a large crown of ten sharp, pointed horns along the base of the head.
American group of Regal Horned lizards have evolved an exceptionally bizarre defense against predators: when under threat they can restrict blood flow from the head until mounting pressure ruptures small blood vessels in and around the eyes, resulting in a spurt of blood that may leap a meter (3 1/2 feet) or more [source].

o hey, look at that parietal eye!

rhamphotheca:

libutron:

Regal Horned Lizard - Phrynosoma solare | ©Jason Penney   (Tohono O’odham Indian Reservation, southwest Arizona, US)

Phyrnosoma solare (Phrynosomatidae) are among the larger species of Horned Lizard. Their Latin name is derived from the meaning “rays of the sun” by referring to four large occipital horns at the base of the head continuous with six temporal horns, form a large crown of ten sharp, pointed horns along the base of the head.

American group of Regal Horned lizards have evolved an exceptionally bizarre defense against predators: when under threat they can restrict blood flow from the head until mounting pressure ruptures small blood vessels in and around the eyes, resulting in a spurt of blood that may leap a meter (3 1/2 feet) or more [source].

o hey, look at that parietal eye!